Saturday Morning Glory



Morning Glory: LadyD Books

I love the deep shades of purple found in the morning glory but watch out as they magically grow along the fence and begin to engulf the neighborhood!

 "A morning-glory at my window satisfies me more than the metaphysics of books."
~ Walt Whitman


In this meadow starred with spring
Shepherds kneel before their king.
Mary throned, with dreaming eyes,
Gowned in blue like rain-washed skies,
Lifts her tiny son that he
May behold their courtesy.
And green-smocked children, awed and good,
Bring him blossoms from the wood.

Clear the sunlit steeples chime
Mary’s coronation-time.
Loud the happy children quire
To the golden-windowed morn;
While the lord of their desire
Sleeps below the crimson thorn. 

Glory in the Morning

Amy Dee Stephens


A poem about morning glories…
Trumpet-shaped flowers, heart-shaped leaves,
They’re quick to grow – as easy as you please.
But don’t ask a farmer if he likes this plant.
He’ll say it’s a nuisance and go on a rant.

The Morning Glory

I awaken to the glory of the morn',
sunshine streaking, birds cheerfully cheeping,
another day is born.

The Morning Glory inaudibly climbs,
and shares its shy beauty, so rare.
And, we know that behind its mystery,
Our Creative God is there.

He blesses us with sunshine,
He blesses us with rain,
because it's only through the showers,
that do we not, remain the same.

So, as this new day awakens,
and I'm cradled securely in Your arms,
May Your love forever keep me safe,
and sheltered from all storms.

Sandra Lewis Pringle~

I am participating in Flowers on Saturday and Quote It Saturday



PreS-Gr. 2. Alda, who contributed photographs to 97 Orchard Street, New York (2001), and Kovalski, who illustrated Rivka's First Thanksgiving (2001), collaborate on another book set in the crowded tenements of Manhattan's Lower East Side in the early twentieth century. A young girl worries about her mother, a homesick Italian immigrant who rarely smiles. After the girl wins a packet of morning glory seeds at a Coney Island fair and plants them in a window box, her mother's mood brightens. Eventually, the vines erupt in a wild profusion that wraps the entire neighborhood in brilliant flowers, cheering everyone. In spare, simple language, Alda offers a glimpse of tenement living and an immigrant family's yearning, while the rhyming couplets at the story's end have a rollicking rhythm that lends itself to reading aloud. It's Kovalski's illustrations, though, that will most attract children's attention. Pencil drawings washed with color re-create the crush of activity on the historical streets and the close quarters at home, as well as the glorious fantasy of the unstoppable flowers.  

Gillian Engberg
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved


A big thank you to Ewa Kelly from http://blueberrycraftandhobbytime.blogspot.com/ for "liking" my lily pad photos last week. I am humbled amongst the photography giants. Nice to have blogging friends and dear readers, thank you!







“You can’t get a cup of tea big enough or a book long enough to suit me." C. S. Lewis



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